Danger Club #8

Tue, Apr. 25th, 2017 10:12 am
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[personal profile] lordultimus posting in [community profile] scans_daily


We were back.

Back home.

The reality that had been consumed by Chronos was restored, and with it, our identities.

It was the Apocatastasis - the rebirth of the universe.

We were finally winning...

But our battle was far from over.


Read more... )

Wednesday reading meme.../ Hugo reading

Tue, Apr. 25th, 2017 10:23 pm
maharetr: Comic and movie images of Aisha's eyebrow ring (The Losers) (Default)
[personal profile] maharetr
Have read:
A closed and common orbit by Becky Chambers. Oh my god, this was a delight on so many levels. Long way was like the moon shot that didn’t quite make it, but the potential was So Close, and here she’s tightened her focus, taken the shot and freaking nailed it. I almost wish the blurb had been a paragraph shorter, and am glad I didn’t read it too closely as it was, because drawing the dots betweeJane and Sidra was this quiet little satisfying click all of its own.

The characterisation and the thinking about what it would be like to be an AI dropped into a body was so good -- Sidra wanting to stand in the corner on a table to mimic a security camera angle, for example. And wanting to be a ship again but also wanting to be a part of people’s worlds, and ugh, feels. The external tension of Jane’s survival is also wonderful and Owl <3 <3. I give particular brownie points for the narrative sounding like a 10/14/18 year olds as she ages. It was an interesting, curious thing to me that Chambers close to make the meat/threat animals so explicitly feral dogs when she could have created a different species of threat entirely. Content note for killing and eating of dogs, if that’s something you’d rather not read. But it’s so well worth reading. Strongly rec. Although I suspect the rest of the novel category is going to be just as strong, so voting this year is going to be hard.

Hugo sampling:
Context: I’m a slow reader, comparatively, so the novel category is the biggest ask of my time (I’m going to carefully turn aside from the new series category!) so I read the amazon samples of the books to make a judgement call on time vs payoff etc etc, and all these impressions are of the first chapter/s of each accordingly.

All the birds in the sky by Charlie Jane Anders. I was sideeyeing the voice of the bird So Hard, and not convinced by the narrative voice, either, and then I got totally sucked in by the invention of the wristwatch that timetravels ... two seconds forwards. That invention, and specfically how it’s handled, definitely got my interest enough to want to pick it up properly.

Ninefox gambit by Yoon Ha Lee. I... I had no idea what was going on for 80% of this. And yet, I read all of it, and ... and. Complicated thoughts. Had it been a year or two ago I would have put it down much earlier as a Puppy pick -- Very Srs Military Bizness. And yet it was Very Compelling very srs military bizness, even though reading it made me feel utterly non-fluent in whatever fantasy/sci-fi ness was going down here. A single kudos for a female protagonist (although having now consumed a steady diet of Kameron Hurley, one lone special female character just Doesn’t Cut It, there has to be women integrated throughout now for me to trust that. That said, it was a legit brave choice to have that dense a world building plus battle without explaination, AND to pull it off that compellingly. It gives me hope for the rest of the book. Will pick it up.

The Obelisk gate by N. K. Jemisin. For some reason I wanted to not like this, and not get sucked back into this world. I’m not even sure why now (I think there was a review that talked about how grim and bleak it was), but I’m pulled back in regardless. Will pick it up.

Currently reading: Am not so much in between books right now as in between sample chapters, but still....

Up next: Sample chapters of:

Death’s end by Cixin Liu. Final/3rd book in a series that I haven’t read is going to be a tall order to pull me in, but I’m curious given the first was 2015’s Hugo novel winner. Anyone able to tell me if knowing the first two is Essential or not?

Too like the lightning by Ada Palmer. It’s not available on amazon.com.au that I can see (*curses*), so getting the sample chapters to my phone is slightly more cumbersome. But the first few chapters are also up on Tor.com here so, score!

After these two I’ll probably jump straight to the novelettes (see here for an excellent compilation of Where to Find the 2017 Hugo Finalists For Free Online so I can start Finishing Things and have categories ticked off before the actual packet lands. So goes the theory!
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[syndicated profile] yalsablog_feed

Posted by Deborah Takahashi

Every April the nation celebrates National Autism Awareness Month to promote “autism awareness, inclusion and self-determination for all, and assure that each person with ASD is provided the opportunity to achieve the highest possible quality of life”1. As teen library staff, we assist teens with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) whether it’s through reference interactions, programs, and/or volunteer opportunities. If staff has yet to interact with this population, celebrating National Autism Awareness Month is a gateway to connecting with this community. Not only is this an exciting opportunity, we, as teen library staff, are charged with “reach[ing] out to and serve ALL teens in the community no matter what their backgrounds, interests, needs, or abilities, and whether or not they frequent the library space2.

So how exactly do we participate in National Autism Awareness Month?  There is a variety of things we can do to spread awareness and invite teens with ASD into the library!  Here is a simple idea from The Autism Society3 that all libraries can implement as a starting point:

Put on the Puzzle! The Autism Awareness Puzzle Ribbon is the most recognized symbol of the autism community in the world. Autism prevalence is now one in every 68 children in America. Show your support for people with autism by wearing the Autism Awareness Puzzle Ribbon – as a pin on your shirt, a magnet on your car, a badge on your blog, or even your Facebook profile picture – and educate folks on the potential of people with autism!

By wearing these ribbons, we can make a statement that will not only show support and solidarity for these teens, but start great conversations with patrons who are not familiar with National Autism Awareness Month. Another great way to promote Autism Awareness is to create book displays, pathfinders, ans/or Libguides featuring characters with ASD and nonfiction titles specifically for teens with ASD.  YALSA’s The Hub has a great archive of postings that focus on both fiction and nonfiction titles for teens so definitely take a look at some of those posts. Along with great book displays and a diversified collections, why not get our teen book clubs involved by reading and discussing a book featuring a teen with ASD. Here is a great handout to give to teens to read before the book club in case they have any questions. If possible, work with community partners, or medical experts, to participate in the conversation so they can answer any questions teens may have regarding ASD.

Another great way to bring awareness to ASD is to actually connect with local organizations that provide services to teens with ASD.  By creating these partnerships, not only are we bridging a huge gap in services to this group of teens, we are letting our communities know that we are excited to provide specialized or inclusive programs and services for these teens. When communicating with these organizations, find out what these teens would like to see in the library and discuss these ideas with our Teen Advisory Boards (TAB). By proposing to our TAB that the library would like to provide services to teens with Autism, and we would like their help, we are providing them with the chance to give back to their community in yet another meaningful way. If this is something that your library may not be able to do (just yet), try adapting current programming to include teens with ASD with the help of these organizations.

Once example that will guarantee a lot of fun, and to encourage interaction between neurotypical teens and teens with ASD, is to host a series of sensory art or craft based programs where teens can use a variety of mediums. Why sensory? According to the Autism Research Institute:

Children and adults with autism, as well as those with other developmental disabilities, may have a dysfunctional sensory system. Sometimes one or more senses are either over- or under-reactive to stimulation. Such sensory problems may be the underlying reason for such behaviors as rocking, spinning, and hand-flapping. Although the receptors for the senses are located in the peripheral nervous system (which includes everything but the brain and spinal cord), it is believed that the problem stems from neurological dysfunction in the central nervous system–the brain. As described by individuals with autism, sensory integration techniques, such as pressure-touch can facilitate attention and awareness, and reduce overall arousal.

– See more at: https://www.autism.com/symptoms_sensory_overview#sthash.Y4DuLPll.dpuf

Image from Handmade Kids Art

Depending where on the spectrum  teens are, some may be super sensitive or under sensitive to tactile objects. Although some teens may enjoy playing with clay, some can express deep displeasure for the texture or smell. In the beginning, teens may not want to touch it all all, but, at some point, they may step step out of their comfort zones and play with it simply because others teens are interacting with the material. If we do these types of activities, try to incorporate a variety of textures (i.e., Playdough vs. Polymer Clay) so teens have options. Whether teens are using clay, paints with different textures and colors, or even building something out of textured materials, teens of all abilities will get to interact with one another, which is incredible to see and will have a profound effect on teens with ASD. In fact, this is a great volunteer opportunity for TAB to lead as they will be the official liasons between the library, teen patrons, and the teens with ASD.

As we start implementing programs and services, don’t forget to share with the world what we are doing! Whether it’s using social media to show what teens have made, or what programs are being held, it’s always a great idea to document our success. For National Autism Awareness month, organizations are using the social media tag of #austismawareness or #lightitupblue to promote National Autism Awareness. As we post away, be sure to include any of these hashtags because we want all of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr to know what we are doing and why. Lastly, don’t forget to measure your success. By providing statistics, feedback, reports, we can build momentum to get libraries all over the country to participate, which is not only AWESOME, but conveys to our ASD teen populations that they have a place in the library. If we take a moment to really think about these teens, they are are also stakeholders who have a voice that can influence library services. Not only is it important to help these teens to succeed, it’s also just as important to empower them. Who knows? What started out as a series of art programs could result into transforming our teens rooms into sensory friendly environments. Anything is possible in Libraryland so what are we waiting for?

References:

1 http://www.autism-society.org/get-involved/national-autism-awareness-month/

2http://www.ala.org/yalsa/aboutyalsa/strategicplan

3http://www.autism-society.org/get-involved/national-autism-awareness-month/

4https://www.autism.com/symptoms_sensory_overview

Awww shit

Tue, Apr. 25th, 2017 08:44 am
quirkytizzy: (Default)
[personal profile] quirkytizzy
It's gonna be one of those up and down days. How do I know? By themselves, Melanie Martinez or Icon For Hire aren't necessarily indicative of grand emotional upheaval. Mix the two? Maybe add in some some specifically about crazy?

I keep crying, hoping to empty it all out. Clear my soul like a tsunami washing out the overpopulated cities and overworking nuclear reactors. There's never enough energy to cry it all out, though, and so it only comes out in the mornings, alone and afraid.

And it's never enough.

I'll rest today. Drink more water. Part of the dehydration is that I keep misjudging the content capacities of the glasses I drink water out of and part of it is that different meds (changed out twice a month, it seems) require different amounts of water. It's like trying to balance on a unicycle with one broken leg and a goddamn anvil tied to the other leg.

So fine. Like Melanie says, let's spill it all out. I don't give a fuck anymore if anyone calls me a crybaby.

Icon For Hire:

"Recovery time, a condition like mine,
What are we talking here?
Make me better!!
Tell me who I’m supposed to be
Tell me who I’m supposed to...
"

Melanie:

"Maybe it's a cruel joke on me
Whatever, whatever.
It's my party and I'll cry if I want to,
Cry if I want to!
I'll cry until the candles burn down this place
I'll cry until my pity party's in flames!
"

(no subject)

Tue, Apr. 25th, 2017 08:09 am

catty cat cat?

Tue, Apr. 25th, 2017 10:03 am
jadelennox: Sleepy cat (c-cat)
[personal profile] jadelennox
I am pretty sure that most of you who can have cats do have cats, but there's a call out for a forever home for lovely, people-loving Thea. US-based, currently in Baltimore, needs to be in a currently-petless and probably childless home. (She adores people and hates cats.)

The Good And Goofy 'Great News' Comes To NBC

Tue, Apr. 25th, 2017 10:00 am
[syndicated profile] monkeysee_feed

Posted by Linda Holmes

Briga Heelan plays Katie, a news producer whose mother barges in on her already chaotic workplace.

A new NBC comedy has a lot of 30 Rock DNA, and it shows. While it's uneven at first, viewers who stick with it will get a satisfying blast of very silly jokes.

(Image credit: Greg Gayne/NBC)

It me

Tue, Apr. 25th, 2017 02:53 pm
hollymath: (Default)
[personal profile] hollymath
Here's me doing The Worst Clerical Job in the World on Saturday. I look happy because [profile] ladyphackney, who was taking the picture, made me laugh...so it turned out okay I think.

My official last LJ post*

Tue, Apr. 25th, 2017 08:44 am
telophase: (Default)
[personal profile] telophase




* until and unless something happens, of course.

(no subject)

Tue, Apr. 25th, 2017 09:41 am
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
Good news on the hysterosonogram-- No fibroids, no polyps. Things aren't quite right in ways that the doctors put down to the Tamoxifen, so they want me to have another scan (not clear if another hysterosonogram is needed or if a uterine ultrasound would be enough) in three or four months. I've got moderate sized (about 2 cm) simple ovarian cysts on both sides. If I understand correctly, because of my age and the size of the cysts, those will have to be rechecked every year unless they go away.

There's some confusion about the appointment I have scheduled for Wednesday morning. UHS's system doesn't show any such appointment ever existing, but the patient portal still shows me that I've got an appointment there at 10:50 Wednesday morning. It popped up with instructions for the appointment last night, and I still have the upcoming appointment reminder I got a few days back and the appointment scheduled message. I would rather not need to go to UHS Wednesday morning, but I also don't want to deal with a missed appointment fee or not go if the doctor has something to say.

I crashed hard yesterday at about 4:30. I don't think I slept, but I also wasn't awake. I lay in bed and didn't move much at all for about three hours until it was absolutely necessary for me to eat something and take my dinner time medications. After that, I ended up staying up until my normal bedtime.

I got a response from my email to Interlochen. They do have accessible cabins, and they supply golf carts for campers who can't manage all of the necessary walking (there's a lot of walking. Certainly more than Cordelia could manage day after day on crutches). My impression from what the contact person said is that they put in temporary ramps for whichever cabins need them, but I could be completely wrong.

Scott and I finished filling out most of the forms last night. There's one more that we need to get Cordelia's doctor to sign before we turn it in, but that one doesn't need to go in until June. I had been under the impression that it wasn't mandatory, but apparently it is. It's a permission slip for giving Cordelia specific OTC medications as needed. The form says they'll only do it twice a month without specific other forms from the doctor filled out for each occasion which seems kind of silly for something like, say, ibuprofen for menstrual cramps.

I need to do some laundry today, and the trash needs to go out. I've already done several minor chores, so I'm resting a bit. I kind of want a nap, but I think I need water more than I need sleep because I had very little water yesterday.

I have some ideas for things I can add onto my Fandom5K to make it work better. My first reader pointed out that there's a good bit of time between the deadline Saturday and the reveal, so I can edit if I come up with more text or change things or whatever. I'm very used to thinking of posting deadlines as the end. One of the changes I should make will be painful because it will involve changing POV for some events and losing a few lines that I love. I don't usually have to do the killing my darlings thing, but this time, I need to.

The OT yesterday showed me some hand flexibility exercises. She also showed me some massage techniques for my hand and then told me that I can't do them because the pressure required would be bad for the thumb on the hand doing the massage. Given that, I'm not quite sure what the point of showing me was. I've got a short list of (hopefully) not too expensive things that might help with the exercises or with tasks that I need to do.

She had a pen that she thought might be easier for me to use. Sadly, I couldn't even get it all the way to the paper. It was too long for me to hold it the way I was supposed to, and the way I need to rest my hand to deal with the tremor was an issue, too. Basically, the things I do to work around the tremor actively conflict with the things I should do for the osteoarthritis. Since I can't write at all without dealing with the tremor and can cope with the osteoarthritis long enough to, say, address an envelope, the tremor coping techniques win.

She also showed me their pain scale which doesn't even remotely match mine. For me, pain bad enough to provoke swearing is a six or a seven. Pain bad enough to want to take medication and/or to be constantly aware of it is a three. For them, swearing is a nine, and medication/awareness is a five to a six. I kind of looked at the chart and thought that it was really for people who don't normally experience pain. It basically stretches out the lower end and has no room at the top for severe pain. I've always assumed that anything that hurt enough to rate a ten would kill me because my body couldn't handle it and that a nine meant pain so bad I passed out or mentally checked out in some other way.

ETA: And the nurse from the gynecology clinic just called to say that, oh, she was wrong and I do have an appointment tomorrow. She thinks I should keep it, and I think her reasoning is sound. If nothing else, I can get clarification about what additional scans I need when and see about scheduling anything that needs doing soon. I think that I would also like the gynecologist to talk to the oncology folks. The pain issues had inclined me heavily toward not going back to the Tamoxifen, and I think this is more on that side of the scale. I'm also kind of curious as to why the radiology report said I was post-menopausal when everyone else keeps saying that I'm not there yet (all of them use 'perimenopausal' except my primary care doctor who hates the term while still acknowledging it as a stage of life. I think she considers it too medically imprecise to be useful).

The Edge of Worlds Paperback

Tue, Apr. 25th, 2017 07:44 am
marthawells: (Stargate)
[personal profile] marthawells


I think it's already been shipping, but this is the official release day for trade paperback reprint of The Edge of Worlds. It's the second to last Raksura book.

Books read in 2017

Tue, Apr. 25th, 2017 08:35 am
rolanni: (readbooks from furriboots)
[personal profile] rolanni
23. Convergence, C. J. Cherryh, (read aloud with Steve)
22. Rock Addiction, Nalini Singh (e)
21. The Stranger in the Woods, Michael Finkel
20. Etched in Bone, Anne Bishop (e)
19. Rider at the Gate, CJ Cherryh (re-read)
18. Small Gods, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
17. Silence Fallen, Patricia Briggs (e)
16. The Cold Eye, Laura Anne Gilman
15. The Cat Who Could Read Backwards, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
14. Memory, Linda Nagata (e)
13.  Bonita Faye, Margaret Moseley (e)
12.  Burn for Me, Ilona Andrews (e)
11. Snuff, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
10. A Taste of Honey, Kai Ashante Wilson (e)
9.  Some Danger Involved, Will Thomas
8.  Thud!, Terry Pratchett (read aloud w/Steve)
7.  White Tiger, Kylie Chan
6.  The Hanging Tree, Ben Aaronovitch
5.  Trading in Danger, Elizabeth Moon (e)
4.  The Wolf in the Attic, Paul Kearney (e)
3.  The Cat Who Saw Red, Lillian Jackson Braun (read aloud w/Steve)
2.  Inside the Texas Chicken Ranch: The Definitive Account of the Best Little Whorehouse, Jayme Lynn Blaschke (e)
1. Sand of Bone, Blair MacGregor (e)

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